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SCHEME / LOCATION: Chesterfield

CLIENT: National Trust

 

TG SERVICES: Ecology

 

PARTNERS / OTHER CONSULTANTS INVOLVED: Reading Designs, IrriplanLimited, Chris Mills Consulting, BSA Heritage

 

Hardwick Hall Estate,

Derbyshirer Grange was appointed by Commercial Estates

 

Hardwick Hall Estate is a Grade I Registered Park. Tyler Grange’s ecologists were instructed by the National Trust to review existing ecological data and undertake baseline ecology surveys and provide advice to inform a parkland conservation plan. The overall objective of the parkland plan (to be funded by a Higher Level Stewardship Scheme (HLS) agreement) is to conserve and, where appropriate, restore the historic landscape to reflect the functional, commercial and ornamental development of this estate. 

 

Parts of the park and some of the woodlands support diverse flora and fauna and include a number of statutory and non-statutory designated sites, both within and adjacent to the site. These include a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and County Wildlife Sites (CWS). Our ecologists undertook botanical surveys, and detailed surveys for water voles, a species that had declined significantly at the site owing to mink predation. We also interpreted the results of detailed dead-wood (saproxylic) invertebrate surveys, for which the site is nationally important. 

Our specific advice related to minimising impacts and maximising the biodiversity potential of the following operations:

•    restoration of the nationally important duck decoy, which is now in progress;


•    de-silting of existing degraded and polluted CWS waterbodies; 


•    management of fish stock, grazing regimes and waterfowl; 


•    improved riparian habitat management, including mink control to benefit water voles;  

     
•    improved hedgerow and tree management.